Colour Matching

I have tried using mega blocks and coloured squares to help Sophie to learn her colours but I wanted to do some other activities to help her to recognise colours. I cut some shapes out of felt and put them in the tuff spot with the leftover felt cut into a large square shape. When I did this activity, Sophie still wasn’t talking much so I wanted to focus on language.

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I read a really interesting article that suggested you should say ‘The (name the object) is (name the colour)’ e.g. ‘The circle that is red’ rather than ‘the red circle’. The study showed this helped children to understand colours more quickly because it focused their attention on the object and then the colour. It also helped them to learn that the colour is a property.

So I said ‘this shape is red’. Then I placed a red circle onto the yellow felt and said “No, this shape is not yellow. This shape is red.” Then I placed it on another colour and repeated the sentence, changing the colour word. Then I placed it on the correct colour and said “Yes. This shape is red.” We did this a few times together and then Sophie started to sort the colours by herself.

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I also added some wooden circles from her stacking ring and some mega blocks for her to match. She placed the green ring onto the blue felt and said “nah” then placed it onto the green felt and said “yeah”. She was beginning to sort and match the colours independently and use the language that I had modelled.

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Sophie loves to hide things and it didn’t take long for her to hide the objects under the felt sheets.

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She signed ‘where’ then revealed them and shouted ‘there’. We played ‘hide the shape’ quite a few times!

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After we finished playing, I left this activity set up as an invitation to play on her shelves. She has set it up by herself and sorted the colours independently quite a few times since we did this activity. You know when she has got it out because you hear ‘nah… nah… yeah!’

This activity is good for:

  • Listening and Attention – encouraging children to focus on an activity
  • Mathematics – beginning to organise and categorise objects
  • exploring colours and learning their names

Anna

 

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